Exhibitions

Branko Lenart – ‘Body.Language 1971 – 2010′

 

Branko Lenart, Body and Soul, 1975

from November 5, 2010 until January 5, 2011

Galerija Dom KULTure Ptuj


Back in the 19th century, the photographic eye became dedicated to the naked – predominantly female – form. With a refined focus on body language, Branko Lenart additionally extends the classical and popular motif of the nude. Rather than ousting or even losing nudity, his approach points out poises, gestures and touches, whilst the pre-eminence of a human body vindicates its place in the immensity of the natural milieu. Past and present, artificial and natural, form the horizon of projection to meet a motif which, in this particular case, is not confined to the lustful eye.

Due to the sensual-erotic and ultimately sexual components of such photographs, their quality parameters are more at risk in this thematic field than they are in any other; indeed, in contact with such alluring images, ones perception can be somewhat blurred. Does Branko Lenart call his work in progress since 1971 Body.Language in order to distance himself from the broad field of nude photography, or to open the eye to a new experience and a somewhat different perspective of nudity? The answers to such questions are revealed in a variety of ways; for example, body fragments are posed in front of landscape, and natural textures extend the regular vocabulary. Hands and arms, feet and legs are reduced to their sculptural forms and set in contrast with a rocky relief. As much a characteristic and distinctive element of this image forming technique is its special communication with the nude; the photographer himself intervenes with an open palm to the body placed in front of him, thus transforming the moment of action into a rigorous permanent composition. The detail of a petrified nude is photographically reproduced in the same pose and format, and placed against an individual lying on a rocky shore.

With a refined focus on body language, Branko Lenart additionally extends the classical and popular motif of the nude. Rather than ousting or even losing nudity, his approach points out poises, gestures and touches, whilst the pre-eminence of a human body vindicates its place in the immensity of the natural milieu. Past and present, artificial and natural, form the horizon of projection to meet a motif which, in this particular case, is not confined to the lustful eye.

Werner Fenz

Branko Lenart, Body and Soul, 1975