Adrijana Pajović: My History: Nen and Brajan in the Bed

From November 4 until December 1, 2010

Galerija Simulaker Novo mesto


Aleksandrija Ajduković, Benjamin Beker, Goran Micevski, Vesna Micović, Branka Nedimović, Miloš Nenković, Andrijana Pajović, Tijana Pakić-Feterman, Dragan Petrović, Ivan Petrović, Katarina Radović, Mihailo Vasiljević.

Curators: Vesna Micović, Katarina Radović.

The selection of works for presentation of contemporary Serbian photography is based upon a diversity of approaches to the photographic medium and on the variety of subjects which co-exist in a common aesthetic, social and ideological universe. The image these artists offer about themselves, their identity as well as their environment, acts as the complex image of the world from which they rise. They belong to the younger generation of Serbian photographers who, in the given socio-political situation, decorate their own historical stage, raising a number of new questions or offering answers to some raised long time ago.

The artists belong to the younger generation of Serbian photographers who, in the given socio-political situation, decorate their own historical stage, raising a number of new questions or offering answers to some raised long time ago. They offer an image about themselves, their identity and their environment, which acts as the complex image of the world from which they rise.

Benjamin Becker engages objects and symbols of the institutionalized history of former Yugoslavia and its lifetime President Tito, while Mihailo Vasiljević discloses Serbia’s mythical space as one of the most powerful forces ruling over its people. Through appropriating iconic photographs, Andrijana Pajović builds her own history of photography, touching upon the eternal question of original and copy. Ivan Petrović’s images are composed of photomontages of elementary school pupils who were given roles as TV presenters, by way of which he reinvents pieces by commercial photographers in an era when television has experienced a boom and become a mechanism of social control. Aleksandrija Ajduković’s pseudo brand campaign for a Chinese washing powder is a reaction to the socio-economic paradox of the tremendous demand for Chinese products (un)supported by a complete lack of advertising. Katarina Radović’s intriguing and seductive compositions satirize the desirable, making an ironical statement about the collective folly of the contemporary world and its psychological, moral and sexual ambiguities. Miloš Nenković produces theatre-like reconstructions of celebrated paintings using Lego figurines, thus strengthening photography’s own vocabulary, and, with unsurpassed charm, reviving scenes portrayed by the old masters. Branka Nedimović’s painting-like prints of people officially declared dead in absentia comment upon the fear of death and the unknown, and also refer to the more recent history of Serbia. Dragan Petrović’s portraits of countrywomen from the Falcon Mountains (Sokolske Planine) posses a specific humour in the presentation of an authentic mixture of the beautiful and the repulsive. The way young Gypsy girls appear in the photographs of Tijana Pakić-Feterman has many references to the aesthetics of fashion magazines; socially marginalized young women are conscious of social reality and the fashion glamour in which they are trying to incorporate themselves. Goran Micevski’s photographs of houses in suburban Belgrade reveal peculiarities emanating from a lack of taste and their transient character. Vesna Micović performs a visual-semantic experiment of cutting out persons in her photographs, thus posing questions as to the uniqueness of our being and the stability of our memory.

Vesna Micović, Katarina Radović

Supported by Krka d.d., Novo mesto.